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Who's a pretty boy, then?

The Times Magazine
Monique Rivalland
31 October 2015

Leila Jeffreys’ remarkable portraits of rescue bird.

For Wonder, a rare albino turkey vulture, life can be trying. His terrible eyesight means that “he is afraid of his own shadow”, says Australian photographer Leila Jeffreys. He was found face down in the snow in Michigan and is now at a Californian rescue centre, where Jeffreys took his portrait. “There is a gentleness to him that makes me melt,” she says.


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Sophie Cape - Into the Shadows

The Sydney Morning Herald - Spectrum
John McDonald
10 October 2015

"A mother and daughter turn to paint and canvas to comprehend a family tragedy".

In light of World Mental Health Day, John McDonald reviews Ann  and Sophie Cape's current exhibition 'An Unending Shadow: Works Exploring Dementia' at Mosman Art Gallery.


Drawn to Dusk - Artist Paul Davies puts his crafted LA work on show at Sydney

Australian Financial Review
Helen O
3 October 2015

Paul Davies cuts his stencils with the same kind of scalpel blade his ophthalmologist father uses to slice into eyes. The results are different of course. Davies junior's use of the scalpel is potentially far less messy and brings forth images that are apparently serene and seemingly two-dimensional. Yet the issue of redefining vision is the same. That is a theme that has defined this 36-year-old artist's career to this date. Born in Sydney, now living in Los Angeles, he often uses mid-20th-century modern architecture in his work yet says what is there is not what it seems.


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Paul Davies

Art Almanac
29 September 2015

“My work is driven by friction between opposing forces of built and natural environments, design and art, abstraction and figuration.” We chat to Davies about his new exhibition ‘Other Desert Spaces’ and the direction his move to Los Angeles has steered his work.
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Anh Do paints big lives for his first solo exhibition at Olsen Irwin Gallery

Sydney Morning Herland
Andrew Taylor
April 9 2015

With a portrait in last year's Archibald Prize exhibition and as a finalist in several other art shows, Anh Do's artistic credentials would seem to be beyond doubt.
But Do's gallery dealer Rex Irwin has been a tough judge to please.
"He came before last year's Archibald and he looked at all the work and he went 'This is pretty much all not good enough'," Do says. "And I said 'What about that one? That's my dad and I'm going to put him in the Archibald' and he said 'No, not very good'."
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Sophie Cape: Getting the art fix

Artist Profile
Owen Craven
19/2/15

Sophie Cape is a former professional athlete who retired from competitive sport ahead of the 2008 Beijing Olympics due to injury. She dabbled in art from a young age – inspired by her artist grandmother (Gwenna Thatcher) and mother (Ann Cape) – but it was when her sporting career came to an abrupt end that her art making became the perfect outlet for her restless, athletic energy and her love of being outdoors. Cape immerses herself physically and emotionally into the landscape. It’s here that she has discovered and developed her unique visual language, making large-scale, visceral artworks composed predominately outside, on the ground in seclusion.


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Is There Great Art on Instagram?

Vulture
Jerry Saltz
December 2014

For me, Instagram is a land of the midnight sun, a wide-open place that's always lit up, bristling with visions, pictures, strangers, shooting stars, screwballs, and well-known artists posting images from everywhere, together creating this immense abstract missive or amazing rebus that seems to speak just to me, the curious curator of my own lit-up Instagramland. Strangest in this strange land is that 123,000 people now follow me. Or are following their idea of me: New York Magazine's art critic acting out in pictures online.
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Claudia Karvan steps in as Noah Taylor acts up

The Sunday Telegraph
Elizabeth Fortescue
8 June 2014

With his new film Edge of Tomorrow screened across Sydney this week, and his art exhibition opening yesterday in Woollahra, all that’s missing of Noah Taylor is the man himself.
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Noah takes time out for a doodle

Daily Telelgraph
Elizabeth Fortescue
January 28 2013

"I think everyone has their own doodling style," says Taylor, a prominent actor ever since his appearance in the 1987 hit film, The Year My Voice Broke.
He is referring to that automatic writing of symbols that people indulge in when they're "on the phone and talking about whatever to an accountant or something". He has found his personal symbols have tended towards the figurative.
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Noah Taylor's art a place to connect with people in depth

The Nation - The Australian
Rick Morton
January 26 2013

NOAH Taylor may be a fixture in the Australian psyche for his acting performances over 27 years but his passion has always been closer to canvas than cameras.
Taylor, who scored his breakthrough role in The Year My Voice Broke in 1987, has revealed little of himself in interviews over the years but he told The Weekend Australian his art was a connection to people.
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Bird Girl

Belle Magazine
Harry Roberts
Nov 7 2012

Leila Jeffreys finds her wings giving flight to birdlife as art.
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Pretty Boy

Vogue Living
Madeleine Hinchey
Nov/Dec 2012

Meet Slim, a sulphur-crested cockatoo snapped by Leila Jeffreys as part of her native Australian cockatoo portrait series. Her photographs, printed at over one metre tall, capture the endearing personalities of these beloved birds, from shy and sweet to downright cheeky. 7–25 November, Tim Olsen Gallery, 63 Jersey Road, Woollahra NSW; timolsengallery.com.
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Wild Cockatoos by Leila Jeffreys

Coco Republic Field Notes
Beth Finchk
October 8 2012

I have always had an inexplicable fascination with birds, particularly the unique array we have here in Australia – from Lorikeets to Lyrebirds and everything in between.
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Marisa Purcell: Halo

Art Alamanac
Jillian Grant
October 1 2012

Ethereality is inherent in Marisa Purcell’s latest body of work, aptly titled ‘Halo’, presented by Tim Olsen Gallery, Sydney. Her series of oil
paintings are contemporary meditations on pre-Renaissance sacred imagery, responding particularly to the work of Fra Angelico in Florence’s San Marco monastery, which took Purcell’s interest during her residency in Chianti,
Italy earlier this year.
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Marisa Purcell: Halo

Art Almanac
Jillian Grant
30 September 2012

Ethereality is inherent in Marisa Purcell’s latest body of work, aptly titled ‘Halo’, presented by Tim Olsen Gallery, Sydney. Her series of oil paintings are contemporary meditations on pre-Renaissance sacred imagery, responding particularly to the work of Fra Angelico in Florence’s San Marco monastery, which took Purcell’s interest during her residency in Chianti, Italy earlier this year.
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Marie Hagerty's Mutating Canvases

Australian Art Review
Prue Gibson
2/11/11

Prue Gibson explores the artists swelling and elastic forms which appear to change shape before the viewers eye.
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What Now? Melinda Harper

Australian Art Collector
Courtney Kidd
Jan 2011

What Now?

MELINDA HARPER

Your dazzling paintings in the 1990’s with right, clashing colours, attracted a lot of attention. What have you been working on lately?

I’m focussing on the show coming up in March. It’s made up of embroidery works, small scale about 30 by 30 centimetres in size and all done by hand. Their embroidery mesh is spray-painted, they’re like the way I work with paper.
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Marie Hagerty: The Real Thing

Australian Art Collector, Issue 43
Sasha Grishin
January - March 2008

Marie Hagerty over the past few years has established and refined her pictorial language to arrive at a form which is peculiarly her own. She is a young artist in her early 40s whose most recent work is certainly her best.
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